Home > Working with Behavioural Issues > Working With Teachers to Resolve Behavioural Issues

Working With Teachers to Resolve Behavioural Issues

By: Sarah Edwards - Updated: 27 Sep 2016 | comments*Discuss
 
Working With Teachers To Resolve Behavioural Issues

Accepting that your child’s behaviour may have changed and could be causing problems and conflict both within your family and in school, is a hard situation for any parent to find themselves in. Asking for help and working with others to try and find a way to manage and ultimately solve the problem is the best way to proceed, but it is not always that easy to ask for help.

Professionals

Teachers and other professionals who work within education are all trained and highly experienced in dealing with children’s behaviour, and they really will want to support and guide you through any difficult times you may be going through. Sometimes it is very difficult for us to 'see the wood for the trees' when it comes to those close to us. It could be that you really don’t want to accept there is a problem, or that you have accepted it but simply cannot see a way forward. Maybe you have sought help before and it hasn’t worked out and you now just feel like giving up and giving in to your situation.

When the Going Gets Tough...

It is really important to understand that whatever you may be experiencing might be new to you, but that many other parents have been through exactly the same or worse and that the teachers who want to help you will have the best interests of you, your child and your family at heart. Asking for help should never be seen or regarded as a sign of weakness or failure, and educational professionals will never think this. They will genuinely want to try their best to help you because ultimately if your child is displaying behaviour at school that is causing problems in the classroom, it has to be sorted out.

First Steps

Once you have decided that you are going to seek help from teachers and other school staff then approach them with your worries and concerns and try to set a time and a date for a proper meeting. This way you will all have a chance to voice your concerns and try and work out exactly what it is that is impacting so heavily on your child’s behaviour.

Teachers will Understand

Never underestimate the strength and importance of the relationship that your child may have with their teacher as this will be key to finding a solution to the problem. Teachers spend a lot of time with our children and get to know them very well. They may be able to offer a valuable insight into why your child’s behaviour has been affected and give you some ideas for how you can try to encourage your child to talk about their feelings and emotions and find a way through a difficult situation.

It could be that your child feels more able to talk to school staff than to you, and this should not be seen as a negative thing. In fact it is always encouraging to know that our children feel comfortable and confident enough to talk to their teachers about any problems.

Open and Honest

Being open and honest is the key to being able to communicate any problems and find a way through bad patches. By making it clear to your child that you need to speak to their teacher in order to help them and you make sense of what is happening, is far more positive than constantly nagging your child, shouting at them or ignoring them. Be patient and keep talking and with the help of teachers and the wider school community, you will find a way through your problems.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
Mother- Your Question:
To whom it may concern, I need your help, please. Is there a cognitive behavioural course available in either Redbridge or London? My Daughter as Social and emotional Autism along with Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Anxiety and I'm desperately trying to support her. My Daughter has recently started Secondary school and it's really tough for her.

Our Response:
Can you ask your school, education authority or your daughter's GP for a referral?
KidsBehaviour - 28-Sep-16 @ 12:49 PM
To whom it may concern, I need your help, please. Is there a cognitive behavioural course available in either Redbridge or London? My Daughter as Social and emotional Autism along with Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Anxiety and I'm desperately trying to support her. My Daughter has recently started Secondary school and it's really tough for her.
Mother - 27-Sep-16 @ 6:26 AM
Having read through the various behaviour issues, I find it a mind field and very negative. unfortunatly in the day and age we live in school heads should be keeping an eye on the staff. I have witnessed teachers on their mobile phones in primary school, teachers having a crying fit infront of the children, hardly proffesional I would say. Further more I have heard gossiping teachers and other members of staff making degrading comments about some of the children, calling them thick etc. Holy Trinity dartford, wilmington academy and swanscombe secondary school to name but a few. All of which have been failing the children thatattend. Since most of the day the children spend a considerable time in school, this is where there bad habits are learnt from. schools are taking children who have add adhd autisum and all other learning disabilities. Its about time people realised these children should be in a school designed and equiped with these disabilities and should not be attending main stream school.
nickname - 16-Jun-12 @ 11:24 PM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Latest Comments
  • Lea
    Re: Children and Body Rocking
    My son has been rocking since he was 4 months old. He is 10 now. He still rocks; we called it "swooshing". He's socially aware that…
    2 December 2018
  • MotherEarth54
    Re: Questionnaire: Does Your Child Have ADHD?
    |I work with children who display "mild" signs. They are often intelligent and can answer questions about things…
    29 November 2018
  • Sass
    Re: Questionnaire: Does Your Child Have ADHD?
    Hi my five year old son has been excluded from school 8 times already this year he has now been put in a pupil…
    25 November 2018
  • Soods
    Re: Smacking and Children
    We have just been accused of abusing our children by the school. We have 4 children, 3 boys and a girl, have always disciplined our…
    23 November 2018
  • Bewmommy
    Re: Children and Body Rocking
    My son and daughter both rock. Have rocked since they were babies. Never been a problems. My daughter's preschool called to say they…
    21 November 2018
  • Sue
    Re: Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)
    My son is 4 and just recently started reception at primary school. He was in the same nursery for a few years prior when…
    14 November 2018
  • George
    Re: Questionnaire: Does Your Child Have ADHD?
    Hi this has been going on for a few years now. My son is 9 he has been under the senco for a few years now and…
    13 November 2018
  • Bonsailady
    Re: Children and Body Rocking
    I rocked until 6 years of age, when my father had enough of the car shaking back and forth and made me stop. Soon after being forced…
    10 November 2018
  • Annmarie
    Re: Questionnaire: Does Your Child Have ADHD?
    My daughter who is 6 always walks on tip toes has no concentration is really naughty and doesn't sleep sometimes…
    4 November 2018
  • anitsirhcoj
    Re: Children and Body Rocking
    I’m a pregnant rocker. Will it hurt my baby? I am 8 weeks and I wish I could stop for once but I can’t. also it’s cool to know I’m not…
    3 November 2018