Home > Managing Behaviour > Tips For Helping Kids Adjust To Change

Tips For Helping Kids Adjust To Change

By: Beth Morrisey MLIS - Updated: 6 Sep 2012 | comments*Discuss
 
Children kids changes children And

Whether it’s a new home, new school, new class or new baby, changes can affect children in many different ways. Some children become sullen, some children begin to act out, some children seek attention and some children all but attempt to disappear. Thankfully there are many ways that parents can help kids adjust to change.

Giving kids time to work through the differences, ensuring that the change brings some benefits to the child and setting clear boundaries for children are just a few of the ways that adults can help kids adjust to change.

Giving Kids Time

No one can absorb the full implications of a change overnight, so expecting children to fly through changes is unrealistic. Instead, parents should expect to give their kids time to understand what is happening, what it will mean for them, what it will mean for the family and how it will change their lives and/or routines.

While adults may be able to work through these possibilities logically, children usually need to experience them to understand them. Parents can help children with these lessons by talking with them every step of the way and ensuring that children understand all of the implications of the changes.

Ensuring that Change Brings Benefits

There’s not a person alive that likes it when their life changes for the worse, so an important way that parents can help their children adjust to change is to make sure that somehow, in some way, the change adds something to the child’s life.

For example, if a child is unhappy about proceeding to the next class at school, parents can attach a special privilege to the move to help children understand that growing up is inevitable, but more rights and responsibilities are attached to getting older.

Similarly, children who must adjust to a new baby in the house can soon learn the many rights and responsibilities of being an older sibling. Ensuring that children understand how the benefits relate to the change will help them understand these larger associations.

Setting Clear Boundaries

Children like boundaries, and maintaining a sense of order during an upheaval in their lives will help them feel as though they still retain some control and they still have a routine to follow. This usually helps children stay calmer as they know what to expect and what is expected of them.

For example, when moving into a new house parents who enforce the same rules – no straying from the garden, no playing in the attic, picking up all toys in the play room – remind their children that the same things are expected of them regardless of where they are which in turn provides children with a sense of security.

Some children are able to deal with changes with minimal disruption, but many children experience significant discomfort during periods of change. Parents can do much to help their children adjust to changes including giving kids time to work through the changes, ensuring that changes bring benefits to the children’s lives and setting clear boundaries for their children throughout.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
Why not be the first to leave a comment for discussion, ask for advice or share your story...

If you'd like to ask a question one of our experts (workload permitting) or a helpful reader hopefully can help you... We also love comments and interesting stories

Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Latest Comments
  • whale
    Re: Children and Self-Harm
    My 8 year old brother has been scratching himself for a while when i tell him its time to shower or when i tell him to do something he…
    24 January 2021
  • naz
    Re: Grounding Children
    i've been grounded for ten years because of fortnite
    21 January 2021
  • Jizzy
    Re: Smacking and Children
    So im 12 and my mom has hit me many times before. I suffer from depression and PTSD from it. Sometimes when she moves her hand slightly too…
    8 January 2021
  • Jizzy
    Re: Grounding Children
    So im 12 years and the reason im in trouble for is private but long story short, my mom went through my phone when me and my friends were…
    8 January 2021
  • Mom
    Re: Grounding Children
    I am a mother of four. Three teenagers and an eight year old. I know from personal experience spankings don't work! It just makes the kids act…
    27 December 2020
  • AllyKat64
    Re: Children and Body Rocking
    Man I am 32 and MY chair in the livingroom is a rocking chair. I am open with my fam about it. Neither of my kids do it. I do it in my…
    23 December 2020
  • Imded
    Re: Grounding Children
    My parents grounded me for two months but they can’t see that it’s making me do worse. What should I do
    7 December 2020
  • Jojo
    Re: Questionnaire: Does Your Child Have ADHD?
    My so 3 years old he can respond his name , when he is busy he doesn’t look at by calling him, he use lots of…
    27 November 2020
  • Reecy
    Re: Questionnaire: Does Your Child Have ADHD?
    I'm in shock my daughter's is 8 now for the last 3 years I have suspected something was wrong. This site has just…
    10 November 2020
  • Marie
    Re: Questionnaire: Does Your Child Have ADHD?
    My daughter is nearly 16 she has all the signs of adhd she does anything for attention she breaks things she lies…
    7 November 2020